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Gibson Electrics

Gibson EH-150 V1 Class A tube amp (1935)

This is a 1935 Gibson EH-150 Style 1 Class A Amp from Gibson. The first Class A amp ever! Like all amps of the time, there was no control panel on the chassis of the first EH-150s. The power cable, fuse holder (round, house-fuse style on earliest models), on/off switch, pilot light, and two inputs were all secured directly to the backside of the bottom-mounted, bent-metal chassis. A black crinkle paint covered all the exposed surfaces and, like many of the amps of the time, there were no volume or tone controls.

1940 Gibson EH-150 V3 15W Class A tube amp (ON HOLD)

This is a 1940 Gibson EH-150 Style 3 Class A Amp from Gibson. Compared to the style 1 the tweed case was enlarged and rounded on the left and right top edges, eliminating the need for the top four leather corner protectors (a transition model with the new circuit and the old cabinet has been reported, but these are either really rare or prototypical). Speaker size increased to a 12″ field-coil with the Gibson name on the magnet cover. A beefed up circuit employing seven tubes featured the relatively new 6L6 beam-power variety, in metal.

Gibson Les Paul 1957 Goldtop R7 Murphy Aged (2002)

R7 Goldtop at its best by Tom Murphy! Pick up this Tom Murphy aged 1957 Gibson Les Paul Historic Reissue and behold the history of this iconic guitar transformed into an incredible time capsule of an era that defined rock music as well as the electric guitar. Tom Murphy's aging treatment is out of this earth. Check out the close up pictures. The thick neck profile comfortable to hold, and boasts a special, powerful resonance that cuts right through the mix. This axe sings! Tuned down with a set of 13th and a slide...wooaw!!

Gibson EH-150 Lapsteel Guitar (1940)

Most sources state that the lap steel guitar was invented by Joseph Kekuku in 1885. The story is that, at the age of 7, Kekuku was walking along a railroad track and picked up a metal bolt, slid the metal along the strings of his guitar and was intrigued by the sound. He taught himself to play using this method with the back of a knife blade. The instrument became a major fad in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s. The instrument became especially popular in Hawaii, as musicians played in tent-rep shows.

Gibson EH-185 Lapsteel Guitar (1939)

Here is another 'Hawaiian' beauty: the Gibson lapsteel EH-185. Gibson was a bit slow in entering the so-called Hawaiien craze in the begining ot the 20th century. But once the did the went full-thottle. Most sources state that the lap steel guitar was invented by Joseph Kekuku in 1885. At the age of 7, Kekuku was walking along a railroad track and picked up a metal bolt, slid the metal along the strings of his guitar and was intrigued by the sound. He taught himself to play using this method with the back of a knife blade.

Gibson Barney Kessell Custom (1963)

Here's another fine instrument that was build for mr. Barney Kessel by the great craftsman at the world famous Gibson Kalamazoo factory. Influenced by Charlie christian, during the late 1950s Barney Lessell was one of the most popular jazz guitar players in America. During the early 50s Barney Kessel played on the gibson es-350, later on in the late 50s he endorsed 3 guitars from a company called Kay musical instrument Co. In this period Gibson convinced Barney Kessel that they would match the deal he had with this company and build him a better guitar .

Gibson Trini Lopez Deluxe Cherryburst (1965)

Ultra rare 1965 Gibson Trini Lopez Deluxe. Throughout its long and esteemed history, Gibson has kept its guitars associated with artists. Top players were often seen in Gibson advertisements and catalogs, and a few models were named after leading artists of the day, including Nick Lucas, Les Paul, Hank Garland, and Billy Byrd. By the early 1960s, Gibson accelerated this tradition by concentrating on even more artist-endorsed models. The list of ’60s players with signature Gibson guitars includes Tal Farlow, Johnny Smith, Barney Kessel, the Everly Brothers, and of course Trini Lopez.

Gibson EH-275 Lapsteel 1940 (SOLD)

Gibson introduced their top of the line EH-275 in September 1940 with the only reference found in the Catalog AA supplement for October of that year. Most sources state that the lap steel guitar was invented by Joseph Kekuku in 1885. The story is that, at the age of 7, Kekuku was walking along a railroad track and picked up a metal bolt, slid the metal along the strings of his guitar and was intrigued by the sound. He taught himself to play using this method with the back of a knife blade. The instrument became a major fad in the United States during the 1920s and 1930s.

Gibson Les Paul R9 Historic Collection (2001)

One of the best I have ever heard. From my private collection. Very hard to let go but... that's life. She deserves playing cause that what she is really good at. Loud, resonant, woody. Nice fat 59 neck. And lightweight at 3.7kg/8.15lbs due to the Honduran Mahogany that was used at the turn of the millenium by Gibson. Pickups were replaced in 2003 with an awesome custom made set by Peter Florance' 59 Voodoo. Original pickups are still there of course. if you want them changed just let me know.

Gibson Explorer Sammy Hagar Red Rocker Signature (2011)

Sammy Hagar's inimitable style on a guitar lead Gibson to a heavy-rocking, hard-driving new project and the introduction of the Sammy Hagar Explorer. Crafted in the image of the original Explorer of 1958—a guitar that was blindingly ahead of its time back in the day—and graced with an original blend of Sammy's Red Rocker and Chickenfoot styling, the Sammy Hagar Explorer is an eye-catching axe from every angle, and equipped for everything from searing to sublime tonal adventures, too. 

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